INFORMATION FOR YOUR PATIENTS

TRICUSPID
REGURGITATION (TR)

TRICUSPID REGURGITATION (TR)

The tricuspid valve separates the right lower heart chamber (the right ventricle) from the right upper heart chamber (right atrium). Tricuspid regurgitation (TR) is a condition in which this valve does not close properly, causing blood to flow backward (regurgitate) into the right atrium each time the right ventricle contracts.1

SYMPTOMS OF TRICUSPID REGURGITATION

TR places an extra burden on the heart and lungs, and the heart may have to work harder to function normally. It is possible for a person to have TR without experiencing any symptoms. In some cases, some of the following symptoms may be experienced1,2:

Shortness of breath

Fatigue or weakness

Abdominal swelling

Swollen feet or ankles

Pulsing in neck veins

Heart rhythm problems (arrhythmias)


Patients with moderate or severe
TR can have significantly impacted quality of life.

  • TRICUSPID REGURGITATION TREATMENT

    Treatment for TR depends on how severe the condition is and what caused it. Mild TR may not cause symptoms or require treatment. If the condition is severe and causing symptoms, medications or surgery may be needed. The goal of treatment is to improve the heart’s function while minimizing symptoms, prevent complications, and improve quality of life.1

    • Medications: A doctor may prescribe medications to help manage TR symptoms, such as water pills (diuretics) to remove excess fluid from the body, or medications to treat an underlying condition that is causing TR1
    • Surgery: The Tricuspid valve may need to be repaired or replaced, which is usually performed through open-heart surgery1
    • Transcatheter edge-to-edge repair (TEER): If the doctor determines that open-heart tricuspid valve surgery is not an option—due to age, advanced heart failure, or other associated medical conditions—a minimally invasive treatment option called transcatheter edge-to-edge repair may be a possibility

    If left untreated, TR can lead to heart failure and death2

A person with severe TR may be at too high a risk for open-heart surgery, but may be eligible for a minimally invasive treatment option called transcatheter edge-to-edge repair (TEER).

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