INFORMATION FOR YOUR PATIENTS

Mitral Regurgitation

TREATING MITRAL REGURGITATION BEFORE IT PROGRESSES

Mitral regurgitation (MR) places an extra burden on the heart and lungs, and the heart may have to work harder to function normally. The mitral valve is a heart valve that lies between the left atrium and left ventricle. The valve opens and closes to ensure that blood flows in only one direction. In mitral regurgitation, the valve does not close completely and blood leaks backward (regurgitates) into the left atrium.1 The more open the valve remains, the more blood regurgitates and the more severe the problem.

SYMPTOMS OF MITRAL REGURGITATION

It is possible for a person to have TR without experiencing any symptoms. In some cases, some of the following symptoms may be experienced:

Fatigue or inability to exercise

Sensation of feeling the heart beat (palpitations) or a rapid heartbeat

Dry, hacking cough (often worse when lying down)

Shortness of breath

Fainting

Swollen feet or ankles

WHAT CAN HAPPEN IF MITRAL REGURGITATION IS NOT TREATED?

Mitral regurgitation places an extra burden on the heart and lungs. Over time, some people may develop an enlarged heart because it has to work harder to pump blood through the body. If it is not treated, mitral regurgitation can cause other, more serious problems with the heart, such as heart failure. This is a condition that occurs when the heart can’t pump enough blood to meet the needs of the body.1

TREATMENT OPTIONS FOR MITRAL REGURGITATION

Treatment for mitral regurgitation depends on how severe the condition is, and if it’s getting worse.1,2 The goal of treatment is to improve the heart’s function while minimizing the symptoms and avoiding future complications.

  • Medical Management

    Medications may be prescribed to help manage symptoms of mitral regurgitation, such as diuretics for fluid buildup in the legs and lungs. However, these medications only treat the symptoms and do not address the underlying problem with the mitral valve that is causing the disease.

  • Mitral Valve Surgery

    Considered the most effective long-term treatment for mitral regurgitation, surgery gives the greatest probability for a safe and effective solution over time. Several surgical procedures are available to repair or replace the mitral valve, including traditional open-heart surgery, which involves opening the sternum (with an incision over the chest and sternum), minimally invasive surgery that does not involve opening the sternum, and less invasive robotic procedures.

    Surgical Mitral Valve
    Repair

    If mitral valve repair is an option, a surgical technique called an annuloplasty may be performed. This procedure typically involves the implantation of a device to tighten or replace the ring around the mitral valve (annulus) so that the valve leaflets can close properly. When needed, other techniques may be used to repair the valve.

    Surgical Mitral Valve
    Replacement

    If the mitral valve cannot be repaired, valve replacement with an artificial (prosthetic) valve may be recommended. Two types of prosthetic mitral valves are available: mechanical or tissue.

  • Transcatheter Mitral Valve Repair (TMVr)

    TMVr, now referred to as TEER (transcatheter edge-to-edge repair), is a minimally invasive procedure that may be an option for patients with severe mitral regurgitation. Unlike surgery, this procedure does not require chest incisions and temporarily stopping the heart. Instead, a thin tube (called a catheter) is guided through a vein in the leg to reach the heart and mitral valve. During the procedure, a clip (or sometimes more than one clip) will be implanted onto the center of the mitral valve to help it close more completely. This reduces mitral regurgitation, and the valve continues to open and close on either side of the clip, allowing blood to flow through.

  • Transcatheter Mitral Valve Replacement (TMVR)

    TMVR is a minimally invasive procedure that allows a new, artificial valve to be inserted within the diseased mitral valve that is causing the mitral regurgitation. Unlike surgery, this procedure does not require chest incisions and temporarily stopping the heart. Instead, a thin tube (called a catheter) is guided directly into the heart or through a vein in your leg to reach the mitral valve. The replacement valve is then inserted through the catheter and placed within the existing mitral valve and secured in place. This new mitral valve then opens and closes properly, allowing blood to flow through the heart. 

SURGICAL MITRAL VALVE REPLACEMENT

If a mitral valve cannot be repaired, valve replacement with an artificial (prosthetic) valve may be recommended. Two types of prosthetic mitral valves are available: mechanical or tissue. Each type of valve offers different benefits and risks.

CHOOSING BETWEEN A MECHANICAL VALVE OR A TISSUE VALVE

Mechanical valves are made of strong, long-lasting materials such as carbon and titanium and are designed to last for the rest of the patients’ life. However, patients are required to take daily blood-thinning medication for the rest of their lives to help prevent blood clots.1,2

Tissue valves are made with tissue from pig or cow heart tissue (or a combination of the two) and can possibly last 10-15 years, requiring another surgery or procedure to replace the valve if it wears out. Tissue valves do not usually require long-term use of blood-thinners.1,2

To determine the optimal valve, a doctor will take many factors into consideration, such as age, overall health and medication requirements.1

Less than 50 years old

A mechanical valve is recommended based on a review of current clinical evidence and a discussion between a doctor and patient, especially if:

  • The patient is already taking a blood thinner for another health problem
  • The patient can safely take a blood thinner and is willing to do so

A tissue valve may be recommended depending on lifestyle.

Between 50 to 70 years of age

The type of valve recommended will be based on a review of current clinical evidence and a discussion between doctor and patient.

Greater than 70 years old

A tissue valve may be recommended with some exceptions depending on the clinical situation if:

  • The patient does not want to take a blood thinner or cannot take it safely
  • The patient is willing to have another valve replacement procedure if the tissue valve wears out

In rare cases, a mechanical heart valve may be recommended.3

The information provided is not intended for medical diagnosis or treatment or as a substitute for professional advice. Consult with a physician or qualified healthcare provider for appropriate medical advice.

MAT-2201007 v1.0 | Item approved for Global OUS use only.

Copyright © 2022 Abbott, 3200 Lakeside Dr, Santa Clara, 95054, U.S.A.
Caution: These products are intended for use by or under the direction of a physician. Prior to use, reference the Instructions for Use, inside the product carton (when available) or at eifu.abbottvascular.com or at medical.abbott/manuals for more detailed information on Indications, Contraindications, Warnings, Precautions and Adverse Events.
Illustrations are artist’s representations only and should not be considered as engineering drawings or photographs. Photos on file at Abbott.
Unless otherwise specified, all product names appearing in this Internet site are trademarks owned by or licensed to Abbott, its subsidiaries or affiliates.
No use of any Abbott trademark, trade name, or trade dress in this site may be made without the prior written authorization of Abbott, except to identify the product or services of the company.

MAT-2000631 v8.0 | Item approved for Global OUS use only.

YOU ARE ABOUT TO ENTER AN ABBOTT COUNTRY OR REGION SPECIFIC WEBSITE.

Please be aware that the website you have requested is intended for the residents of a particular country or countries, as noted on that site. As a result, the site may contain information on pharmaceuticals, medical devices and other products or uses of the product that are not approved in other countries or regions.

YOU ARE ABOUT TO LEAVE
www.structural­heart.abbott

You are now leaving www.structuralheart.abbott. Abbott is not responsible for any content published on the third-party website you are about to enter. Abbott has not reviewed and does not endorse any information presented on third-party websites.